Conference on Dangar Itihas held in Khulna

Writer and journalist Gouranaga Nandi speaks during a program organized by Pragati Lekhak Sangha, Khulna titled Sampradayikata Bishayak Tinti Baktrita at Umeshchandra Public Library in Khulna on Friday. – Press release

Pragati Lekhak Sangha, Khulna on Friday hosted the second in an ongoing series of lectures to explore the roots of sectarian violence at Umeshchandra Public Library in Khulna.

The lecture series titled Sampradayikata Bishayak Tinti Baktrita includes three solo lectures based on three books, namely Sampradayikata by Badruddin Umar, Dangar Itihas and Romila Thapar by Sailesh Kumar Bandopadhyay, Communalism and the Writing of Indian History by Harbangsha Mukhiya and Bipan Chandra.

Writer and journalist Gouranaga Nandi delivered the second solo lecture on Sailesh Kumar Bandopadhyay’s book Dangar Itihas on the program. Poet and playwright Romel Rahman gave the welcome speech during the program.

Writer and journalist Gouranaga Nandi, in his solo lecture, said: “The British East India Company indiscriminately plundered the riches of the Indian subcontinent. The Sepoy Mutiny was the first movement to protest British rule. Since then, the British had begun to exploit the differences in religious beliefs between Hindus and Muslims.

“Although the British have left and we have become an independent country, the sectarian violence has not stopped. People continue to be killed in the name of religion and politicians try to take advantage of this,” Gouranaga Nandi added.

Pragati Lekhak Sangha, Khulna held the first lecture under the series titled Sampradayikata Bishayak Tinti Baktrita on May 27. SM Fariduzzaman, Head of Department of Psychiatry at Khulna Medical College Hospital, lectured on Badruddin Umar’s Sampradayikata.

The closing conference will take place at the same location on June 17. Writer and editor of literary magazine Kaktarua Saleh Mohammad Shahidullah is to give a solo lecture on Romila Thapar, Harbangsha Mukhiya and Bipan Chandra’s Communalism and the Writing of Indian History.

Angela C. Hale