Robison Conference tackles sports podcasting – The Bradley Scout

Photo via Robison Lectures

Sports podcasts are among the newer ways sports fans are consuming sports media. From scathing shots to an easy way to keep up to date with your favorite sports teams, there’s something for every sports fan.

The Robison Lecture Series, which began in 1988 in honor of Bradley educator and journalist Mary Leslie Robison, has focused heavily this year on podcasting and its role in multiple information and media industries. media.

Ty Hildenbrandt and Dan Rubenstein, co-hosts of “The Solid Verbal” (one of the oldest and most listened to independent podcasts), joined a Zoom conference on April 19 to talk about their journey in the podcasting industry jock.

“The Solid Verbal” started in 2008, when podcasts were still a thing of the future. Focusing on college football, the idea came about when they were working with SI.com, with Hildenbrandt writing a college football column called “Quick Slants” and Rubenstein shooting his popular “SI Tour Guy” video series.

What started as an accident sparked the interest of tens of thousands of avid listeners.

” The beginning [podcast] the shows weren’t good, but we kept going,” Hildenbrandt said. “Being able to do well takes practice; it has taken us a long time to get to where we are.

It took Hildenbrandt and Rubenstein two years after they started “The Solid Verbal” before they met in person, and, even to this day, they’re still doing their show across the states virtually.

Preparation is key for ‘The Solid Verbal,’ as Hildenbrandt and Rubenstein need to be aware of everything that’s going on in the world of college football, from watching games to catching up on missed games and consuming all types of media. possible.

Even after all the preparation, the podcasts only have a lifespan of about 48 hours since new football games start every Saturday during the college football season.

Hildenbrandt and Rubenstein admit that the process has changed in some ways since the first time in 2008. On the technical side of the production, Hildenbrandt insisted that “[he] would bore you all to tears if [he] told you about all the little tweaks” in regards to the changes he had to make to the show over the years.

Hildenbrandt and Rubenstein insist that one of the difficulties in preparing for this work today, as opposed to in 2008, is that there is so much information available that it is difficult to determine the best way to consume everything.

College football has a “season” like most sports, so having a college football-only podcast can be hard to sustain during the offseason. Meanwhile, Hildenbrandt and Rubenstein make bad ideas interesting and find unique ways to move the series forward.

Examples they did include discussing teams that went 3-9 on March 9 and listening to albums to join songs with college football teams.

“The offseason is just a big sandbox for ideas,” Hildenbrandt said. “We also try to bring pop culture into the show, because football doesn’t happen in a vacuum.”

The next phase of “The Solid Verbal” appears to be heading in a direction that will incorporate more video, live streaming, and adding new shows to the family.

“We are constantly looking for ways to improve the product,” said Hildenbrandt.

Angela C. Hale